WYRED Florence

Between 13 and 15 November 2017, the consortium partners participated in the third WYRED project meeting, hosted in the Oxfam Italia premises in Florence.

The meeting was not just essential to assess the progress made so far and share the diverse experiences and expectations pooled during the first cycle of implementation, but it also proved crucial to define the next steps to be made.

The need to define new strategies to engage more stakeholders and young people in the project activities was, in a way, the core of the meeting; many other ideas were also shared, most of them trying to resolve the main concerns arisen during the implementation of the first phase.

The efforts and discussions made over the three days definitely paid off: the consortium partners succeeded in solving most of the issues concerning the accessibility to the online platform, redesign the Delphi from scratch, and scheduled several national and international events to promote the Project. Online forums on topics of current and global interest have also been set up: they will be focusing, at least at this initial stage, on environmental pollution, tolerance and migration, gender-based discrimination and violence, and be led by the young participants to the WYRED Project.

Stay tuned to receive further information about the future of WYRED!

The post WYRED Florence appeared first on netWorked Youth Research for Empowerment in the Digital society.

TECCOM18 workshops on the WYRED platform

TECCOM18 workshops on the WYRED platform

A group of 80 young people of the first year of the Degree in Social Education at the University of Salamanca has collaborated in the development of pilot experiences of the WYRED platform.

In this case, and in the context of a subject in which conflict resolution is addressed, the students were divided into 12 groups to promote a series of social dialogues on topics that they considered to be of interest and that fit into the set of topics of the project.

The process of selection and configuration of the social dialogues began with the presentation of the proposed themes in a collaborative mural using Padlet (https://padlet.com). Once exposed in the classroom, with the purpose of guaranteeing the greatest possible variety of topics, the groups designated a partner who would act as a facilitator and who, later, would be responsible for inviting the rest of the classmates and setting up their own community in the community platform.

Students will discuss the chosen topic in their group for three weeks and will prepare a report in which the following aspects will be reflected:

  • Definition and description of the chosen topic.
  • To what extent the chosen theme affects them as young people.
  • Proposals to solve or improve the situation of the problem addressed.
  • Experience of use and proposal of improvement of the WYRED platform.

The topics chosen by the students cover the following aspects, among others: reasons for stress among young people; cyberbullying, sexting and other forms of digital humiliation; machismo and distorted image of women in the digital society; anonymity, privacy and digital identity; deep web; influencers, false myths and digital popularity.

Educational Assessment & Evaluation in Digital Society

Francisco José García Peñalvo and María José Rodríguez Conde of the University of Salamanca presented an overview of the research of the GRIAL group on multiculturality and educational innovation at the 5th edition of the international TEEM conference Technological Ecosystems for Enhancing Multiculturality, organized by the GRIAL group this year in collaboration with the University of Cádiz and the EVALfor group.

In particular, the track on Educational Assessment & Evaluation in Digital Society chaired by researchers of the E-EVALINTO team, was the framework for the presentation of the new trends on Assessment & Evaluation to a specialized group of stakeholders.

The GRIAL group is currently working on four Erasmus+ projects focused on valorizing intercultural teaching and learning from different perspectives: the promotion of multilingualism in classroom (VALUE), the training of teachers in dealing with the inclusion of migrant students (STEMS) and more properly on topics like contemporary religious pluralism (SORAPS) and the evaluation of the impact of peer mentoring activities as a methodological approach to foster the creation of an intercultural context at school (E-EVALINTO).

WYRED Platform launch

WYRED Platform launch

The first version of the WYRED platform is now available. After months of development and internal testing, in which we have been working intensively, we started the public experimentation phase, initially open to small groups and controlled by the consortium partners. The environment will be tested with the collaboration of users of different age ranges and interests, with the aim of having a robust, reliable and safe system, able to adapt to the different uses that can be made of the platform in the framework of the project.

In the next months, these groups of users invited by the partners will carry out different activities, mainly oriented to the development of social dialogues. Small groups will also be invited to carry out collaborative projects and to present their results.

In this way, the WYRED environment will be ready to accept any initiative that fits in with the objectives of the project.

SORAPS Project presented during annual conference of the International Society for Historical and Systematic Research on Textbooks and Education Media E.V. in Augsburg

The Ca’ Foscari University of Venice was officially invited by the International Society for Historical and Systematic Research on Textbooks and Educational Media (IGSBi) to the Annual Conference of the International Society for Historical and Systematic Research On Textbooks And Educational Media present EU projects related to Religious Education. Never, as in the year of the Fifth Centenary of the Protestant Reformation, addressing the important and often neglected topic “Religion and Educational Media” has proved so relevant. The numerous proposals and the pleasing number of more than 60 participants, were further proofs of the importance of the topic.

Within this context, the IERS – Intercultural Education through Religious Studies project and its successor, the SORAPS – Study of Religions against Prejudice and Stereotypes have been presented and greatly appreciated by the participants. The contributions from the conference will be published in a volume in 2018.

Report of the second SORAPS Project meeting Augsburg (Germany)

The second SORAPS project meeting took place in Augsburg (Germany) last October, with the participation of all the consortium partners. The summit marked the definitive transition from the IERS to the SORAPS, other than an opportunity to assess all the project activities implemented and the working processes carried out so far, especially those involved with a greater engagement of the partner schools.

The IO1 (Guidelines on Stereotypes and Prejudices on Religions) finalization was also assessed, with the consortium partners committing to bringing it up to date with new insights throughout the life-cycle of the project. The IO2 (i.e. the Teachers Training Course) was also thoroughly discussed, and its curriculum, the topics addressed, and the training materials, schedules and activities to be done by teachers during the course were revised accordingly. The Training Materials for IO2 are currently under realization, while the design of the IO3 (Teachers Training Platform) is now being developed.

Last, but not least, the project meeting also allowed to discuss the consortium’s future strategies for widening our pool of potential stakeholder to whom disseminate SORAPS’s news and products.

First intellectual outputs of the project

The first Intellectual Outputs of SORAPS Project, the document entitled “Guidelines on Prejudices and Stereotypes about Religions” is published and freely downloadable in its first version.

It is a short publication which discusses, on the basis of existent literature and surveys in partner schools, which prejudices and stereotypes regarding religions should be engaged in schools and which training approaches are required to debunk them in a critical and scientifically informed way.

It will serve as guidance for the design of the training materials of the Intellectual Output 2, the Teachers’ Training Course.

Even if is complete in its contents, it is a living document that will be reviewed and updated through the life-cyle of the Project.

SORAPS_IO1_Appendix1_V1

Augsburg (Germany) hosting the second project meeting

Starting from Wednesday 4th, until the Friday 6th, the city of Augsburg will be hosting the partners of SORAPS for their second project meeting.

The end of the first year of the project becomes closer and partners want to discuss about the challenges faced in this period in order to improve the implementation. Beside the management tasks that are constitutive part of project meetings, partners would like, in particular, to deepen the opportunities that this project offers in terms of exploitation, considering the relevance of the topic addressed at this particular historical moment in Europe and worldwide. In fact, stereotypes and prejudices not adequately addressed lead to an increase of intolerance that we are witnessing today. Education and cultural awareness, of children and youth in particular, are the main and the priority channel through which we need to heal and to work on further prevention of this intolerance.That what is SORAPS about!

The “Schools’ intercultural profile” survey: some highlights

The analysis of the results of the survey carried out in the pilot schools identified five topics to be addressed through the implementation of peer mentoring activities, which will be developed during the school year 2017-18.
9 school managers, 27 teachers, 51 parents and 113 students participated in the study providing their personal perspectives on positive impact, challenges, teaching strategies and resources relating to their school community and the inclusion of migrant pupils.

  • Personal Wellbeing / Social Skills

Developing an awareness of our mental, physical and spiritual health is an important life-skill for all people, especially the students in our care.  At different times, our students may have positive and negative experiences that have an impact on their self-image, self-esteem and how they feel about the world around them.  For students who have a migrant background, these experiences can be even more intense because of changes in family circumstances, living conditions and a degree of ‘culture shock’.  It is very important that these students be enabled to attend to their levels of self-esteem, to be aware of their feelings and thoughts and to be able to articulate them where necessary and appropriate.

  • Language / Communication Skills

Many students of migrant background find themselves in a location where the main language is new to them.  This can impact on their personal, social and academic development.  It is important to give these students specific targeted opportunities to learn the language of the country in which they now reside at a pace suitable to them.  It is also recommended that they be enabled to have additional practise in listening, speaking, reading and writing in their new language.

  • My Culture, Your Culture

In a school with a migrant student population, there is much opportunity for all students to learn from ‘real people’ with ‘real life experience’ of a culture other than their own.  Celebrating such diversity is a positive way of exploring the similarities and differences in many aspects of our cultures from language, literature and music to food, lifestyles and religions.  Encouraging students of both native and migrant backgrounds to share their cultures with each other offers them the opportunity to explore their own culture more deeply and give each other a chance to ‘taste the flavour’ of another culture.  Such activities promote inclusion and tolerance.

  • Study skills

Different countries have different approaches to education.  Students of migrant background may be adjusting to different school sizes, class levels, academic subjects, school calendars and timetables, styles of teaching and learning, and school ethos.  It is important that the students develop an understanding of these issues and refine their skills in study and time management.  They should be enabled to try different study techniques and ways to prepare for exams, both oral and written, and how to present their work well.

  • Interests and hobbies

A holistic approach to education is important to achieve a healthy balance between the academic and non-academic school experiences of students.  For their own personal wellbeing, as well as the forging of new friendships or broadening their social circles, it is recommended that students be given the opportunity to share with others their interests and hobbies and be given the chance to try out new experiences.

 

SORAPS project prespented during “Researcher’s night” event organized by Ca’Foscari University of Venice

The SORAPS Project has premiered on 29 September at the Researcher’s Night of Venice, an event of major importance within the larger European Researchers’ Night initiative promoted by the EU Commission.

This round of events has been especially designed to disseminate the outputs of several research projects to the larger public and at the same time to raise awareness on the very same topics in the same day; within this context, the SORAPS project has been presented as another successful output of the long-lasting involvement of Ca’ Foscari in Religious and Intercultural Education thanks to EU funding, just like the previous IERS project was.

The Researcher’s Night provided a nice opportunity to set out the overall aims of the project, as well as the ways SORAPS finds its place in an increasingly globalized era, where intercultural dialogues seem to be the keys to playing a full role as active European citizens. The findings related to the IO1 (Guidelines on Stereotypes and Prejudices on Religions) were also presented, followed by a discussion by Ca’ Foscari researchers.